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Yesterday, Samsung held its annual home entertainment press event to show off its 2014 line of televisions. Not surprisingly, the emphasis was on curved screens, so Samsung chose an appropriate venue for the event – the striking, spiraling Guggenheim Museum on 88th Street and Fifth Avenue in New York.

At the International CES a few months ago, curved 4K televisions were all the rage. And Samsung wants to lead this category, based on what I saw at the press event. There will be two series of curved 4K LCD televisions in this year’s line – the HU9000 series (55”, 65”, and 78”) and the HU8700 series (55” and 65”).

Prices range from $4,000 to $8,000 for the 9000-series models, while no pricing has been announced yet for the H8700 line.  In addition, Samsung will start shipping the yet-unnumbered 105” curved widescreen LCD (also seen at CES) later this year. And there will be a line of curved 2K sets, numbered H8000 (48”, 55”, and 65”).

Samsung's Ultra HD "tree" it right in the Guggenheim lobby.

Samsung’s Ultra HD “tree” was right at home in the Guggenheim lobby.

There are also some “in your face” models for 2014. The current 85S9 UHD TV (85”) will be joined by the 110S9 (110”). Aside from Vizio’s 120-inch behemoth shown at CES, the 110-inch offering is the largest television ever offered to consumers – and it comes at a dear price of $150,000!

Two of the more interesting products shown at this event weren’t televisions. Samsung’s SEK-2500V UHD Evolution Kit is designed to add some degree of future-proofing to all of the Ultra HD sets in the line. It comes with an Intel Quad Core processor, supports HDCP 2.2 and has HDMI 2.0 interfaces, and is intended to update features of the operating systems on these TVs as needed. (They are, after all, just computers with really big displays.)

Samsung also unveiled a UHD Video Pack (CY-SUC105H), not unlike Sony’s 4K media player. The Video Pack is loaded with five 4K movies, three documentaries, and an assortment of short subjects and costs $300. Supposedly, another UHD Video Pack is on the way later this year.

Samsung's Joe Stinziano and Fox's Mike Dunn discuss the details of the two company's 4K content partnership.

Samsung’s Joe Stinziano and Fox’s Mike Dunn discuss the details of the two company’s 4K content partnership.

A partnership with 20th Century Fox was also announced at the press event to “…establish a secure and sustainable next-generation UHD content ecosystem.” Samsung wants to deliver 4K movies and television programming directly to viewers through its Smart Hub platform (which also got a redesign).

There wasn’t much meat in this announcement, but with television sales continuing to decline worldwide (down by 3% for 2013, according to NPD DisplaySearch) and retail prices for television in free fall, there will be more opportunities for profit in software than in hardware, going forward. And although Samsung continues to sit atop the heap (27% worldwide market share in TV sales revenue), they must be wondering where to go from there.

Conspicuously missing from the Guggenheim show was the company’s 55-inch curved 2K OLED TV. Whether that was intentional or not, Samsung’s focus clearly was on LCD technology and all of the ways it can be manipulated. In the Lewis Theater below the main lobby, Samsung demonstrated its PurColor image processing, along with a new dynamic contrast engine and 4K scaling demos. There was even a side-by-side comparison of 4K and 2K LCD panels displaying standard eye charts to show how much more detail could be resolved in a 4K display.

Members of the press get up close and personal with Samsung's Ultra HD technology demos.

Members of the press get up close and personal with Samsung’s Ultra HD technology demos.

I’ve written previously about the HDMI 2.0 interface and how it is barely fast enough to support 4K RGB images with 8-bit rendering, and have wondered on more than on occasion why more TV manufacturers don’t incorporate the faster, royalty-free DisplayPort interface. Well, I spotted one on the back panel of the Samsung Ultra HD TV used for the PurColor demo, although it was marked “TV One Connect” and no one seemed to know much about its function.

Almost lost in all of the hype was the fact that Samsung will have a pair of 75-inch flat screen 2K LCD TVs in the lineup for this year. The H7150 version will carry a price tag of $3,999, while the “entry level” H6350 will be tagged at $3,299. These prices are competitive with Sharp’s 70-inch and 80-inch Aquos 2K sets that are wildly popular for commercial and educational installations, and I suspect Samsung wants to grab a piece of that action for itself.

They jury’s still out on the benefits of curved screens. Yes, Samsung did talk about everyone having a great viewing angle and how curved screens make viewing a more immersive experience. That’s certainly true for the 105-inch 21:9 screen, but I don’t see the advantage for 55-inch 16:9 TVs. And if there are any sources of glare, the curved screen doesn’t eliminate them – it just moves them to some other viewer’s disadvantage.

I will admit, though, that curved TVs do look cooler than flat screen sets. And the choice of the curved, soaring Guggenheim (designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and opened in 1959) as a showcase was inspired.

Now, let’s see if consumers are similarly inspired to purchase a curved TV…

Posted by Pete Putman, March 21, 2014 8:16 AM

About Pete Putman

Peter Putman is the president of ROAM Consulting L.L.C. His company provides training, marketing communications, and product testing/development services to manufacturers, dealers, and end-users of displays, display interfaces, and related products.

Pete edits and publishes HDTVexpert.com, a Web blog focused on digital TV, HDTV, and display technologies. He is also a columnist for Pro AV magazine, the leading trade publication for commercial AV systems integrators.