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A recent story in the Nikkei Asian Review states that Hon Hai Precision Industries – the new parent company of Sharp Electronics – is considering building an LCD panel facility in the United States. The finished panels would likely be intended for televisions.

According to the story, Hon Hai is responding to President Trump’s call to bring back jobs to the United States. When Hon Hai investment partner SoftBank Group’s chairman Masayoshi Son met with Trump last month, he said that both companies would make “significant investments” to create new jobs in the U.S.

In a related story on the CDRinfo.com Web site, Hon Hai chairman Terry Gou was quoted as saying that he’d consider going ahead with such an investment if “the U.S. is willing to offer land at a cost of US $1 for building the panel plants.” Apparently Apple is also part of the discussion and mentioned as a joint investor.

Gou was also quoted in the CDRinfo story as saying that “…U.S. President Donald Trump should love to see a vertically integrated industry such as panel manufacturing grow and develop in the country.”

Coincidentally, Hon Hai and Sharp are getting ready to break ground on a Gen 10 LCD fab in Guangzhou, China at a cost of $8.69B. That plant is scheduled to open in the fall of 2018. People familiar with the project said the proposed U.S. LCD fab would be of the same size and generation.

While this is an intriguing story, there are caveats. First off; LCD factories are mostly automated – they have to be, considering the manufacturing precision involved – so there wouldn’t be all that many permanent jobs created once construction is completed. (The same thing applies to Intel’s proposed semiconductor fab in Arizona.)

Second, most of the permanent jobs will likely require college degrees in the sciences (physics, engineering, and chemistry), aside from basic factory functions, shipping, and facilities maintenance.

But the biggest obstacle to building the plant will be the finished cost of the panels. There’s a reason why the LCD panel industry (and with it, television manufacturing) is migrating to China: Manufacturing costs there are much lower because labor rates are lower. That, in turn, will make Sharp-branded televisions much more expensive than those coming from Korea and China.

Consumers have been conditioned to expect ever-lower TV prices with ever-larger screens. Consider that you can already buy a 55-inch “smart” Ultra HDTV for $500 now: How will a US-made UHDTV compete against that price?

Consider also that in the 4K TV world, Samsung has over a 30% market share and LG has another 15%. Conversely, Sharp’s current TV market share is less than 1% and its brand doesn’t have anywhere near the cache it once had. So Hon Hai would have to find other customers for its panels to avoid underutilization of plant capacity.

Matters are further complicated by the fact that Hisense currently controls the marketing rights for the name “Sharp” in the United States and has no intention of giving them up. That little dust-up is why Hon Hai cut off supplies of VA LCD panels to Hisense last fall, forcing them to look elsewhere for a supplier.

Of course, there’s been plenty of talk in Washington about slapping 20% tariffs on foreign-made goods. That cost would be passed along to customers, and don’t you think Samsung and LG will adjust their prices as needed to maintain their dominant market shares? The net result would be that Sharp-branded LCD TVs would still languish on store shelves while Samsung, LG, Sony, Hisense, and TCL continued to dominate the market.

The recent election was filled with jingoistic slogans like “Bring Back America.” Well, then – which one? The America of the mid-1980s where the television manufacturing business involved lots of workers on assembly lines, hand-wiring CRT televisions and installing them into cabinets?

Sorry, that ain’t gonna happen. The US TV industry was pretty well decimated by 1986 when Zenith finally threw in the towel on TV production stateside. (Zenith was later acquired by LG Electronics.) The Japanese had our number. Then, the Koreans pulled the rug out from Japan, starting in the late 1990s. And now it’s the Chinese TV manufacturer’s turn to run with the ball.

The widespread availability of inexpensive LCD panels from China is a big reason why you can now afford to buy a 65-inch 4K TV for less than $800, or a 4K HDR model for about a grand. For that matter, you can now pick up a 50-inch Full HD (1080p) LCD TV for less than $300, and 42-inch sets have dropped below $200.

Question: Do you really want to pay 30 – 40% more for a given TV just because it’s made on this side of the Pacific Ocean? I didn’t think so. More expensive TVs will prompt people to delay their TV upgrades for a longer time period, which is exactly what Hon Hai doesn’t want to happen, and can’t afford to have happen if they’ve sunk a few billion dollars into an LCD fab.

Time marches on..

The post Turn Back The Clock? appeared first on HDTVexpert.

Posted by Pete Putman, February 13, 2017 2:07 PM

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About Pete Putman

Peter Putman is the president of ROAM Consulting L.L.C. His company provides training, marketing communications, and product testing/development services to manufacturers, dealers, and end-users of displays, display interfaces, and related products.

Pete edits and publishes HDTVexpert.com, a Web blog focused on digital TV, HDTV, and display technologies. He is also a columnist for Pro AV magazine, the leading trade publication for commercial AV systems integrators.